When will I would like a booster? How does the shot have an effect on individuals with diabetes?

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Do you have a question about the COVID-19 vaccine? We will forward your question directly to the experts. CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT YOUR QUESTIONS. If you still have questions about the vaccine, we’d like to help you get answers. We will forward your questions to our local experts. We will answer these questions all day and all week. When do i need a booster? And how does the shot affect people with diabetes? We will answer these and other questions on Monday. Here you find the answers. HOW CAN THE FULL VACCINE GET COVID-19? “My mother currently has COVID because she came into direct contact with some family members who didn’t know they had it. My mother was vaccinated with the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. She was vaccinated almost two months ago. Why does she have COVID when the vaccine is working? Why vaccinate when you can still get COVID? “We put that question to the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Chief of Staff, Dr. Patty Manning, posed. She said no vaccine is 100% effective, leading to some breakthrough cases of COVID-19. “I guarantee you this person wasn’t as sick as they would have been,” Manning said. “This disease, especially if it was an elderly person, has been drastically reduced because of the vaccine.” Manning said while there is a chance that those who choose the COVID-19 vaccine will still contract and show symptoms of COVID-19, they won’t get as sick as they would without the vaccine. WHEN WILL YOU GET A BOOSTER? This nameless viewer asked a question about booster recordings: “I received both Pfizer recordings in February. When should I get vaccinated again? Should I wait until August to make my next appointments as research shows prevention of up to six months? “Dr. Manning said there was no need to book an appointment just yet. “I don’t think anyone should plan for a second vaccine yet,” said Manning. “I think you should wait for the guide to come out in the next few months, I’m sure.” Manning said if the FDA decides a vaccine booster is needed, it will most likely be in the fall or winter. DIABETES AND VACCINATION Many people asked questions about how people with diabetes should handle vaccinations. We went to Suzi Francis, the manager of the St. Elizabeth outpatient pharmacy, for the answer, “We have had many questions about ‘Should diabetics be vaccinated’ and the answer is absolutely yes.” According to Francis, patients with diabetes who become infected with COVID-19 are at a much higher risk of serious complications. Francis said the vaccine would greatly reduce that risk. “In fact, of the three different vaccines, about 3,000 people with diabetes had in their studies,” Francis said, noting that there was no safety difference between these patients and those without diabetes. Francis warned that some diabetic patients had high blood sugar for a day or two after receiving their vaccination shot, but the symptom went away after a while. Francis said the same goes for children: children with diabetes are also at a higher risk for severe COVID-19 symptoms if they don’t receive the vaccine. VACCINE APPROVAL Another popular question related to the approval of the vaccines: “How do you know the potential long-term side effects of a vaccine that has only been studied for a very short period of time?” Francis said, while the timeframe was much shorter than traditional on the approval deadlines the requirements remained the same. “The FDA needs as much data as any other vaccine. We just got rid of that red tape. ”Typically, Francis said there were serious side effects in the first two months of a vaccine trial. “And all of these (COVID-19) vaccines had a follow-up period of at least two months before they could even apply for an emergency permit.”

Do you have a question about the COVID-19 vaccine? We will forward your question directly to the experts.

CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT YOUR QUESTIONS.

If you still have questions about the vaccine, we’d like to help you get answers. We will forward your questions to our local experts.

We will answer these questions all day and all week. When do i need a booster? And how does the shot affect people with diabetes? We will answer these and other questions on Monday. Here you find the answers.

HOW CAN THE FULL VACCINE GET COVID-19?

“My mother currently has COVID because she came into direct contact with some family members who didn’t know they had it. My mother was vaccinated with the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. She was vaccinated almost two months ago. Why does she have COVID when the vaccine is working? Why vaccinate when you can still get COVID? “

We put this question to the Chief of Staff of the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Dr. Patty Manning, forwarded.

She said no vaccine is 100% effective, leading to some breakthrough cases of COVID-19.

“I guarantee you this person wasn’t as sick as they would have been,” Manning said. “This disease, especially if it was an elderly person, has been drastically reduced because of the vaccine.” Manning said while there is a chance that those who choose the COVID-19 vaccine will still contract and show symptoms of COVID-19, they won’t get as sick as they would without the vaccine.

WHEN WILL YOU GET A BOOSTER?

This nameless viewer asked a question about booster recordings: “I received both Pfizer recordings in February. When should I get vaccinated again? Should I wait until August to make my next appointments as research shows prevention of up to six months? “

Dr. Manning said there was no need to make an appointment just yet.

“I don’t think anyone should plan for a second vaccine yet,” said Manning. “I think you should wait for the guide to come out in the next few months, I’m sure.”

Manning said if the FDA decides a vaccine booster is needed, it will most likely be in the fall or winter.

DIABETES AND VACCINATIONS

Many people asked how patients with diabetes should approach vaccinations. We went to Suzi Francis, the manager of the St. Elizabeth outpatient pharmacy, for the answer.

“We had a lot of questions about ‘Should diabetics be vaccinated’ and the answer is absolutely yes.” According to Francis, patients with diabetes who become infected with COVID-19 are at a much higher risk of serious complications.

Francis said the vaccine would greatly reduce that risk. “In fact, of the three different vaccines, about 3,000 people with diabetes had in their studies,” Francis said, noting that there was no safety difference between these patients and those without diabetes.

Francis warned that some diabetic patients had high blood sugar for a day or two after receiving their vaccination shot, but the symptom went away after a while. Francis said the same goes for children: children with diabetes are also at a higher risk for severe COVID-19 symptoms if they don’t receive the vaccine.

VACCINE APPROVAL

Another popular question was the approval of the vaccines.

“How do you know the possible long-term side effects of a vaccine that has only been studied for a very short period of time?”

Francis said while the timeframe was much shorter than traditional approval deadlines, the requirements stayed the same.

“The FDA needs as much data as any other vaccine. We just cut that red tape.”

Typically, Francis said serious side effects occur in the first two months of a vaccine trial.

“And all of these (COVID-19) vaccines had a follow-up period of at least two months before they could even apply for an emergency permit.”